‘Killingly’ excerpt in TriQuarterly

An excerpt from my next novel, Killingly, is now up at TriQuarterly, Northwestern University’s literary journal. This is the Mt. Holyoke College novel, the Honeycrisp apple of my eye, my current labor of love — sadly neglected this summer due to the demands of organizing a move to Hawai’i from Ohio. I’m en route at…

The draft done!

It’s been a busy summer and fall, blog friends! I’m more than halfway through my second fall semester at the College of Wooster and I’ve just finished a draft of Killingly, also known here as “the Mt. Holyoke novel.” It clocked in at more than 151,000 words, which officially makes it a Big Book. (Alcestis…

Wiscon revelry

Wiscon was great fun, especially the meals with friends, our reading on Saturday, and the Genderfloomp dance party Sunday night. I also really enjoyed our panel discussion on heteronormativity in YA dystopian novels, though I think I actually explained my ideas better to Malinda Lo, our moderator, the night before! More on that soon; Julia…

A few worthy reads

First, read this interview with Ana Menendez at The Rumpus. Ana taught the first workshop I took in graduate school, which guided the revisions of the first three chapters of Alcestis. Her new book sounds delightfully odd. Then read Kari Kraus’s op-ed in the Times about digital preservation and archives, which opens by discussing Bruce…

Interviews & audiobook discount; #YAsaves

First: Ed Battistella of Literary Ashland just posted an interview with me about Alcestis, Killingly, my dissertation, and numerous other topics. I read from Alcestis at Ashland’s wonderful Bloomsbury Books in 2010 and was interviewed for Ashland’s “Open Books, Open Minds” TV program when I was in town. (My parents retired to Ashland, and it’s…

TILTS, links, a long goodbye

I spent most of Friday and Saturday at the third and final TILTS 2011 conference at UT. I’m not exactly a digital humanist by trade, though I’ve worked on digital humanities projects (like eComma). But I’m interested in humanities computing, to use the older phrase, and the breadth of this conference’s speakers was really wonderful…

A parable or a knife?

So once again, here’s the current primary-source list for my post-apocalyptic and dystopian novels course (now titled “Coming of Age at the End of the World”). I dropped 1984, but reread The Giver this week — it really is the archetypal YA dystopian, Christ imagery and abrupt ending and all. The Giver, Lois Lowry Riddley…